Kumul

Aletun Village

The Kumul Royal Tomb (also known as the Hami imperial tombs) (哈密王陵) is the tomb building group for the royal family of the Kings of Kumul during the Qing Dynasty. The Uyghur ethnic group calls this place “Aledunleke”(阿勒屯勒克), which means “Golden Tomb”.

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The Kumul Royal Tomb (also known as the Hami imperial tombs) (哈密王陵) is the tomb building group for the royal family of the Kings of Kumul during the Qing Dynasty. The Uyghur ethnic group calls this place “Aledunleke”(阿勒屯勒克), which means “Golden Tomb”. From 1697 to 1930, the Kumul power ruled through nine generations, the longest dynasty in Xinjiang Province. For more than two centuries, the ancient Kumul Kings of Hui played a role in building a stable Xinjiang, subduing rebellions and safeguarding national unity. The Kumul Khanate was nominated by the Qing government as the “head of eight regions in Xinjiang” (回疆八部之首). Ebeidula and his son followed the Kangxi Emperor on expeditions, put down a rebellion at Junggar, and received awards from a grateful Qing government. After the death of the seventh Kumul King of Hui Bohier, the Qing Dynasty granted him the title of “King Peace” and allocated funds to build this Kumul King Tomb, earmarking a site of about 1.3 hectares.
The mausoleum group comprises three parts: the Large Arch (大拱拜), pavilion-style architecture and Aitika Mosque. The 14 metre Large Arch is the tallest oneamong the mausoleum buildings and has a unique structure with strong Islamic overtones.  The arch has a square bottom and round top, without beam support. Inside lies the mausoleum (陵墓) of the seventh Kumul King of Hui Bohier and his wives, and the eighth Kumul King of Hui Mohanned and his wife, all covered with yellow silk, a material that could only be used by the royal family. The internal walls and dome are affixed with white painted orchid tiles, making the mausoleum elegant and solemn.

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